Category: Urbanities (diptychs)

How is urban resilience related to sustainability? Can we bounce forward after a disaster when everything condemns us to bounce back? Is vulnerability really opposed to resilience?
The series “Urbanities” shows two photographic stages for a given urban space where the sense of vulnerabilities, hazards, and disasters are significant. The first one (D0) is the initial picture illustrating an urban scene. The second one (D+) is produced from the argentic paper pre-cut in the dark room. Some parts will be chemically treated with fixing or developer agents at given dilution and time. Others will be left untreated. The different parts will be reassembled in the dark room before being printed and exposed to daylight, resulting in the D+ picture. The way darkness develops in time for certain parts of D + will highlight the challenges raised by the urban space resilience level in comparison with D0.
D0 and D+ are printed on argentic paper grade Ilford MGRC Deluxe Pearl, 21 x 29,7 cm/ 8,25 × 11,75 in
More on the technique in About

Droughts

Inspired by South African and French artists, William Kentridge and Anne Kolin, the below work speaks about our consumer-capitalistic society and disconnected behaviors, infringing basic human rights. It echoes what sociologist Bauman called the passage from “solid” to “liquid” modernity (10), suggesting an ever evolving society where sustainability and social constructions are undermined. The metaphoric […]

Metro Bastille

Metro Bastille, Paris, is a series of five diptychs picturing the artificial subway design and how it produces mental gaps in our relations with others. D0 shows the “Bastille” station photographed during the Covid pandemic. To the empty corridors, distorted shapes and silhouettes of subway passengers photographed before the pandemic have been added. They are […]

Chelsea, NYC, 24th street.

This diptych questions the issues of care and vulnerability in the urban public space. It refers to our collective ability to address such issues seen in the context of our urban space’s perception and our capacity to interact. D0 represents 14 persons obviously insensitive to the needs of a sleeping young man, homeless. In the […]

Feeling Sorry for SF.

The below work is inspired from the “Drawn Stones” of artist Goldsworthy, located at the entrance of the de Young museum, San Francisco.The original cracks aiming to recall the tectonic topography of the area gain here a dramatic perspective. Goldsworthy “Drawn Stones” are echoing Clinton Park boulders, with a dead or alive homeless of the […]

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